Week 1 Review

Week 1 is in the books, and I really can’t believe it’s already Friday! I’m consistently amazed at how fast time can go, and how poorly I still estimate how long something will take.

Without further ado, here are the answers to the questions I’m committed to answering weekly.

1. What did you do this week to make your business better for your customers?

This is a difficult question to answer at this stage because the “business” doesn’t really exist. I’m still in the validation phase, and trying to flesh out that I’m going to have a product to sell.

In the short term, that’s a non-answer, but I think it will make things better for the business long-term because I’ll have a better idea of what customers want and need.

2. What have you done to acquire more customers than last week?

As mentioned in my last post, I’m actually talking publicly about the business. I’ve emailed a few people in the space, gotten good feedback, and even got a nice tweet from Alex Turnbull of Groove. This was really exciting for me as the Groove blog was really one of the biggest inspirations for me to start this project.

I also had an interesting bit of feedback on the level of my goal from Peter Cooper — a prolific educator and curator for anyone unfamiliar. His take was that the goal of $1,000 in MRR is too low. He felt that by shooting for a more ambitious target, I may fall short but still land beyond my initial conservative hopes.

This is really something I’m still thinking over. On the one hand, I want to be conservative and have a realistically achievable goal. On the other, I’m still a dreamer and believe that this could turn into more. I’m definitely willing to move on this, but want to hear your opinion as well.

3. What did you do well that you should repeat?

I’m getting more comfortable cold-emailing people, and just putting myself out there. It can be intimidating to offer something up that you’re unsure about, but I’m starting to realize that there really isn’t any downside. Any potential embarrassment I thought I might have felt hasn’t been felt at all.

4. What did you do poorly that you should reduce?

I need to make it easy for people to offer feedback without taking too much of their time. I started to get discouraged when I would email someone and not get an instant response, or when I would publish a post and ask for “feedback” and not receive any.

First – Unless you’re on the mailing list, it wasn’t simple or obvious that I would love to have an email from you. I have since added my email address to the blog layout, and will start asking for emails.

Second – I added Disqus comments to each post to allow readers to post anything they’ve got there.

Finally – I need to start asking specific questions, and offering a way for people to respond quickly and easily. “What do you think?” or “What’s your feedback?” aren’t great questions.

5. What do you hope to do by next week?

I want to find someone who says whether they would pay for this product. I want to reach out to a few firms who develop with Shopify and Stripe to solicit their feedback. I need multiple people to tell me, “yes,” “no,” or “maybe.”

Everything in my bones wants to hop into a console and type: rails new but I’m going to resist until I know that a market exists.

Bonus: What can I do for you?

I’ve spent a lot of time asking things of my reader, but I want to make sure that I’m answering the questions you have. Want to know how I come up with business ideas? Want to know where I’ve fallen on my face before? Want me to help validate your ideas?

Email me! I’m committed to reading and responding to each email I receive (for now).

That’s all I’ve got this week, but plenty more to come.